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Get the latest weather forecast!

July 11--  If you have friends or family in Louisiana, Mississippi or Arkansas, be aware of what's coming their way.

According to AccuWeather, hurricane watches have been issued, a state of emergency has been declared in Louisiana and mandatory evacuations have been ordered in some places as Tropical Storm Barry formed over the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday morning.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) declared Barry the second named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season with maximum sustained winds 40 mph and moving west at 5 mph.

Barry is forecast to make landfall along the Louisiana coast Friday night or Saturday.

"There is a fairly high chance that Tropical Storm Barry will become a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale before making landfall," according to AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski. If so, Barry will become the first hurricane of the 2019 Atlantic season.

Warmth Erased - Late Week

Barry's flooding rainfall to have much more impact than a typical Category 1 hurricane

In terms of impact, AccuWeather is initially designating this a level 2 storm on its RealImpact™ Scale for Hurricanes. The scale ranges from a 0 to a 5 with 5 having the most severe impact.

"Our greatest concern is for torrential rain that would result in life-threatening flooding," Kottlowski said.

"Heavy, flooding rainfall is expected over a large area especially over much of eastern Louisiana into parts of southern and central Mississippi and parts of southeastern Arkansas."

Rainfall totals will average 10-18 inches with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 24 inches.

Storm surge severity to depend on track, strength of Barry

How strong the storm becomes and the exact track the storm takes may be critical for both flooding rainfall and storm surge flooding, especially in the city of New Orleans.

Some rise in water is likely along much of the upper Gulf Coast, especially along the central and northeastern Gulf Coast.

"AccuWeather meteorologists expect a maximum storm surge of 3-6 feet mostly along and just to the right of the storm's path," Kottlowski said.

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